Western Expresses | T

Submitted by: The Red Cloud Collection

Western Expresses | T 2021-07-11T20:33:21+00:00

Western Expresses | T

Western Expresses Alphabetically

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Taggart’s Express – May, 1866 to Jul, 1868

Grant I. Taggart, who had been a hotel operator, entered the stage business by purchasing the equipment of the California Stage Company in May, 1866. His first ad was in the May 19, 1866 Weaverville Weekly Trinity Journal, noting his tri-weekly trips between Shasta and Weaverville for his U.S. Mail and Express Line, adding that he intended to do a “general express business.” His ad six months later made no mention of express business, instead mentioning he was carrying Greenhood & Newbauer’s Express. His Apr, 1868 ad was headed “Weaverville and Shasta Express, around the time Tinnin & Owen’s Express went under. Shortly thereafter, his Jun/Jul, 1868 ads returned to state that he would be doing “a general express business.” After Sep, 1868 no mention was made of any “general express business.” And, ads from Jul, 1871 onward indicated he was carrying the “U.S. Mail and Wells, Fargo & Co.’s Express.”

Paid Grant I. Taggart's Shasta & Weaverville Express to Shasta

Paid Grant I. Taggart’s Shasta & Weaverville Express to Shasta; exchanged with Wells Fargo & Co. Shasta Jul 19 to San Francisco. One of only two known used examples from Taggart’s Express.

First Ad Weaverville weekly Trinity Journal

First ad, May 19, 1866, Weaverville Weekly Trinity Journal

Western Expresses

Taylor’s Express – Feb, 1851 to Apr, 1852

Lewis Wilson Taylor started his express in early 1851 by running the 200 miles between Sacramento and Shasta, using river steamers to the extent possible. His first ad appeared in the Jun 3, 1851 Sacramento Union, noting that his semi- monthly express went via Marysville, Yuba City, and Hamilton City en route for Shasta. He connected with Henkle & Co.’s Express at Shasta and with Gregory’s Express at Sacramento. Taylor ceased operating his express in Apr, 1852, as competing express companies, including Adams & Co.’s Express, opened offices in Shasta. His last ad appeared Apr 28, 1852.

Taylors Express Shasta April 10 (1851) to Sacramento City

By Taylors Express Shasta April 10 (1851) to Sacramento City; by post office Sacramento City Cal. Apr 17 with 40 (due) for carriage to Wisconsin.

Sacramento Daily Union ad of Nov 4, 1851

First ad, Jun 3, 1851 Sacramento Daily Union

Western Expresses

Taylor’s Express – Feb, 1851 to Apr, 1852

Gregory’s Express with PAID to San Francisco on folded letter signed March 2, 1852

By Taylor’s Express Shasta to Sacramento; exchanged with Gregory’s Express with PAID to San Francisco on folded letter signed March 2, 1852, Geo W. Darrach. Taylor’s Express connected with Gregory’s Express in Sacramento before Taylor gave up the business in April of 1852. Gregory then opened an office in Shasta in the same building in which Taylor had his office before retiring. The Paid Through notation is indicative of the conjunctive carriage between Taylor and Gregory. Business letter enclosed reads in part. …I have a claim to work here that may take me five or six weeks (apparently a legal claim, as the letter appears to be between lawyers).

First Ad for Taylor's Express in the Shasta Courier

The first ad for Taylor’s Express in the Shasta Courier was Mar 13, 1852, as evidenced by this example taken from the Mar 20, 1852 issue (Volume 1, Number 2)

Western Expresses

Thompson & Co.’s Express – Jul, 1857 to Oct,  1857

E. B. Thompson was the proprietor of this small express, which operated in Sonoma County from Jul-Oct, 1857. Thompson & Co.’s Express connected with Wells, Fargo & Co. at Petaluma. Edward Swift, who had been a messenger for Thompson, took over the route at the end of Oct, 1857, thereafter running Swift & Co.’s Express.

Thompson & Co.'s Express Santa Rosa to Petaluma in their printed frank envelope

By Thompson & Co.’s Express Santa Rosa to Petaluma in their printed frank envelope. One of only five known examples from this express, this being the only one carried only by Thompson (all others exchanged with Wells Fargo).

San Francisco Daily Alta California ad of Jul 11, 1857

First mention, Jul 11, 1857, San Francisco Daily Alta California

Last Ad Santa Rosa Sonoma Democrat

Last ad, Oct 29, 1857, Santa Rosa Sonoma Democrat, v1n2 (Swift’s ad superseded in next issue of Nov 5)

Western Expresses

Tickner’s Express – May, 1866 to Aug, 1872

H. C Tickner purchased Prindle & Co.’s Express in May, 1866 and began operating his express from Yreka that ran to the mining camps along the Klamath River and the Scott River Valley. In Mar, 1869 Tickner expanded by purchasing J. D. Hickox express like from Yreka to Rough and Ready. In Feb, 1871, he sold his Scott Valley route to son, Walter A. Tickner, retaining his Scott River route. Robert A. Ward and A. B. Carlock purchased all of Tickner’s routes in Aug, 1872.

H. C. Tickner's Yreka and Scott Bar Express from Fort Jones to Scott Bar

By H. C. Tickner’s Yreka and Scott Bar Express from Fort Jones to Scott Bar, with manuscript notation at left “Paid A.B.C” (A. B. Carlock, who had bought part of Tickner’s Express Aug 10, 1872 and must have still been using the old Tickner handstamp.) Enclosed business letter datelined Fort Jones Sep 7, 1872 (shown below, reduced in size), signed A. B. Carlock.

Business letter datelined Fort Jones Sep 7, 1872

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Tinnin & Owen’s Express – Oct, 1867 to May 1, 1868

Wiley J. Tinnin and John W. Owens were the successors to Greenhood & Newbauer’s Express, as advertised in Oct, 1867. They operated from Weaverville to Shasta, connecting with Wells, Fargo & Co. at that point. Notice was made in the Weaverville Trinity Journal that Tinnin & Owen’s Express would end May 1, 1868. They were immediately superseded by Grant I. Taggart’s Express.

Tinnin & Owens Weaverville Apr 16 (1868) in their printed franked envelope to an unidentified destination

By Tinnin & Owens Weaverville Apr 16 (1868) in their printed franked envelope to an unidentified destination, as this envelope was part of a paste-up, with the back half no longer attached.

Weaverville Weekly Trinity Journal Announcement

Oct 12, 1867 Weaverville Weekly Trinity Journal announcement (above) and first ad (right)

Tinnin & Owen's Express

Western Expresses

Todd & Co’s Express – Jul 13, 1850 to Oct 9, 1851

Alexander H. Todd and E. W. Colt formed Todd and Company’s Express following Benjamin L. Bryan’s departure from Todd & Bryan’s Express on Jul 13, 1850. E. W. Colt operated out of Stockton and served the southern mines through merchant agents, while A. H. Todd anchored the operation in San Francisco. They connected in San Francisco with Adams & Company and in Sacramento with Hawley & Company. Later, they also connected with both Freeman and Reynolds & Company in Sacramento. They extended a line, by steamer, to Portland and Oregon City and brought L. W. Newell into the partnership to work out of Sonora. The partnership disbanded in Oct, 1851 with Colt and Newell taking the Oregon California express operation, as Newell & Company. Todd then combined the remaining California operation with Reynolds & Company to form Reynolds, Todd & Co.’s Express.

Todd & Co Express from Stockton to San Francisco

Forwarded by Todd & Co Express from Stockton to San Francisco on folded business letter datelined Stockton July 15th/51 regarding stoves and ovens.

Todd & Co.'s Express Ad

First ad, Sep 23, 1850, San Francisco Daily Alta California

Western Expresses

Todd & Co’s Express – Jul 13, 1850 to Oct 9, 1851

Todd & Co.'s Express Stockton to San Francisco

By Todd & Co.’s Express Stockton to San Francisco with FREE; by Berford & Cos Express San Francisco Cal. To San Jose. Docket on verso “Appointed Jany 31 1851.”

Appointed Jany 31, 1851
Map of Todd & Co's Express route in blue, Berford & Co.'s Express land route in red.

Todd & Co’s Express route in blue, Berford & Co.’s Express land route in red.

Western Expresses

Todd & Co’s Express – Jul 13, 1850 to Oct 9, 1851

Todd & Co Express with From Stockton to San Francisco on Jan, 1851 folded letter

By Todd & Co Express with From Stockton to San Francisco on Jan, 1851 folded letter. Manuscript Free may indicate company business.

Todd & Co Express with $2.00 express fee from San Francisco to the recipient who docketed the letter Recd Jany 30th 1851.

Lowell, Mass Dec 9 (1850) with 40 rate to San Francisco; by Todd & Co Express with $2.00 express fee from San Francisco to the recipient who docketed the letter Recd Jany 30th 1851.

Western Expresses

Todd & Co’s Express – Jul 13, 1850 to Oct 9, 1851

Todd & Co.'s Express Letter from San Francisco

By Todd & Co Express with their small From San Francisco handstamp to Carson’s Creek (California).

A portion of Charles Drayton Gibbes’ 1852 “Map of the Southern Mines,” showing Carson Creek due east of Stockton

Map of the Southern Mines
Todd & Co.'s Express with their large From San Francisco handstamp

By Todd & Co Express with their large From San Francisco handstamp to Carson’s Creek (California). Docketed Jany 30th 1851

Western Expresses

C. A. Todd’s Express – Apr 22, 1852 to Sep 1, 1853

Charles A. Todd purchased all the assets of Reynolds, Todd & Company and continued to operate from San Francisco and Stockton serving the southern mines. Todd made inroads along the Sacramento River to points above Sacramento, but faced tough competition from Adams & Co. in that area. At first, Todd connected with Gregory’s Express, but later shared an office in San Francisco with Wells Fargo and connected with them for services to the Eastern States. Todd sold his operation to Wells Fargo in Sep, 1853, giving them control of the routes to the southern mines, where they began to compete with Adams.

From Todd's Express Office Sonora to San Francisco with partial Not Paid handstamp

From Todd’s Express Office Sonora to San Francisco with partial Not Paid handstamp. Express charges of 50¢ due by recipient, as indicated by 4/ to pay (four bits, or 50¢ due).

Sonora in January, 1852.

Sonora in January, 1852.

Western Expresses

C. A. Todd’s Express – Apr 22, 1852 to Sep 1, 1853

Todd's Express San Francisco with Not Paid (collect) to Mr. Haight (later governor) in Sonora

Forwarded by Todd’s Express San Francisco with Not Paid (collect) to Mr. Haight (later governor) in Sonora. Folded letter datelined San Francisco May 4, 1853– transcribed, in part, as follows: …The mail steamer is hourly expected and I will forward any letters read by me from home…Henry H. Haight…P.S. May 5. Mail steamer arrived this morning shall probably get my letters this afternoon. [The “New York and San Francisco Steamship Company Pacific Line’s” steamer Cortes arrived San Francisco from Panama May 5, 1853]

C. A. Todd's Express - San Francisco The Pacific

Jun 26, 1852 San Francisco The Pacific

Western Expresses

C. A. Todd’s Express – Apr 22, 1852 to Sep 1, 1853

Forwarded by Todd's Express letter

Forwarded by Todd’s Express Mokelumne Hill to Stockton; exchanged with Gregory’s Express with their Not Paid oval to Sacramento City. The only known example of this Todd’s Mokelumne Hill handstamp.

C. A. Todd’s carriage shown in blue - Gregory’s Express in red

C. A. Todd’s carriage shown in blue; Gregory’s Express in red

Western Expresses

Todd & Bryans Express – Dec, 1849 to Jul 13, 1850

Alexander H. Todd began operating as a one man express service in late July 1849, operating between San Francisco and Stockton and into the southern mines. He formed a partnership with Benjamin L. Bryan by the last week of Dec, 1849, adding E. W. Colt shortly thereafter. Todd & Bryans connected with Adams & Co.’s and Haven & Livingston’s expresses at San Francisco. Bryan sold out to his partners in July of 1850, at which time Todd and Colt formed Todd and Co.’s Express, operating over the same route.

Todd & Bryan's Express from Stockton to San Francisco

Todd & Bryan’s Express from Stockton to San Francisco on folded letter datelined Stockton April 11, 1850; by post office San Francisco Apr 20 40 integral rate handstamp and Paid to Nauvoo, Illinois.

Dateline: Stockton April 11, 1850
…My last letter to you was mailed at Salt Lake. Since that time we have travelled about 1700 miles. The country from Salt Lake to California is one barren waste only fit for Indians to live in there never can be any settlement made on the route…I have been up to the mines made a little money, & then went to San Francisco after letters but could not find any – but hope to receive some from home soon…It is very expensive living in this country – $6.00 per day & you sleep yourself on the ground, but this is California…gold is found principally in the bed of larger streams and they cannot be worked to very good advantage until about 1st July – smaller creeks can be worked at any season of the year…We arrived in California with 1 waggon & 6 yoke of oxen We had 5 waggons when we left the Missouri River…

Western Expresses

T.F. Tracy’s Express  – late 1858 to early, 1859

Theodore F. Tracy established a number of express services operating from a base at Placerville, California. Tracy’s Carson Valley Express advertised in the Placerville Mountain Democrat from Jun 20, 1857 to Oct 31, 1857. By Dec, 1857, Tracy had sold the Carson Valley route to Richard Yarnold, based on newspaper reports. Tracy also partnered with J. I. Spear, Jr. and operated Tracy & Spear’s Express to the north and south of Placerville as early as Sep, 1857 based on newspaper acknowledgements. Tracy & Spear’s Express advertised in the Placerville Mountain Democrat from May 15, 1858 to Oct 9, 1858. Tracy then operated over those routes by himself, following Spear’s departure. And, from 1859 into the 1860s he was Wells, Fargo & Co.’s agent in Placerville.

T.F. Tracy's Express Paid from Indian Diggings

By T. F. Tracy’s Express Paid from Indian Diggings to Diamond Springs with political letter datelined Indian Diggings May 16th, 1859 enclosed. One of only two known examples from this express.

Placerville Mountain Democrat Ad

Jul 11, 1857 Placerville Mountain Democrat ad for Tracy’s Carson Valley Express, for which there are no known covers (line sold to Richard Yarnold by Dec, 1857)

Western Expresses

Tracy & Spear’s Express  – Sep, 1857 to late, 1858

In addition to running his Carson Valley Express, T. F. Tracy also partnered with J. I. Spear, Jr. and operated Tracy & Spear’s Express to the north and south of Placerville as early as Sep, 1857 based on newspaper acknowledgements. Tracy & Spear’s Express advertised in the Placerville Mountain Democrat from May 15, 1858 to Oct 9, 1858. Tracy then operated over those routes by himself, following Spear’s departure. And, from 1859 into the 1860s he was Wells, Fargo & Co.’s agent in Placerville.

Tracy & Spear Manuscript

Tracy & Spear manuscript and boxed PAID handstamp from Placerville area to Spanish Flat; by Wells Fargo Spanish Flat, Cal dateless postmark used as express marking to Georgetown; continued carriage by Wells, Fargo & Co. Express Georgetown to San Francisco. Verso of paste-up shown below.

Verso of paste up

Western Expresses

Truman & Co.’s Express – 1865 to 1868

James C. Truman began his J. C. Truman Express in January 1864 soon after arriving in San Francisco. He took Chapman as a partner on February 16, 1864 and after Chapman withdrew in 1865, he formed Truman & Co’s Express. It operated until 1868 from San Francisco to San Jose by rail and to Watsonville and Santa Cruz.

Truman & Co.'s Express Feb 16, likely from San Francisco, to San Jose in their printed frank envelope

By Truman & Co.’s Express Feb 16, likely from San Francisco, to San Jose in their printed frank envelope. One of only about ten known examples of the Truman’s handstamp marking.

First Ad Truman & Co.'s Express San Jose Weekly Mercury

First ad, Dec 1, 1864 San Jose Weekly Mercury

Western Expresses Alphabetically